Williamsburg Celebrates Black History Month

Black History Month is a poignant celebration of the incredible contributions of the Americans who played a central role in the history of our nation. This special month is celebrated with great enthusiasm right here in Colonial Williamsburg.

If you’re planning a stay at King’s Creek Plantation in the month of February, here are some events you might want to check out for your entertainment and edification!

Journey to Redemption

Journey To Redemption is a powerful, hour-long performance included in your Colonial Williamsburg admission ticket. The historic Kimball Theatre is the perfect venue for this storytelling event, where actor interpreters take on the emotional challenge of portraying both the enslaved and their enslavers. Starting February 3, shows repeat every Tuesday and Friday until the last week in February.

Culinary Historian Michael Twitty

On February 11 at 5:30 p.m., the Kimball Theatre will host acclaimed food historian, author, interpreter and blogger Michael Twitty. This modern-day innovator is part of Colonial Williamsburg’s new Revolutionaries in Residence program, and Michael will be sharing thoughts and fielding questions that coincide with Black History Month.

Moonlight

On February 14, see critically acclaimed Moonlight. This mesmerizing film follows the life and struggles of a young black man growing up in a rough Miami neighborhood. As an intense and moving portrait of contemporary African American life, this piece of cinema is a must-see.

A Century of African American Quilts

You can find this exhibit of rare quilts at the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg. Six of the 12 African American quilts will be on display for the first time ever, and span the years between 1875 and 1975. Get to know the story behind a stunning artistic tradition and the quilt-makers who poured themselves into these bold and colorful designs.

To Be Seen As An American

Come to the Hennage Auditorium in Colonial Williamsburg to meet three black women who challenged their extremely limiting circumstances. Lydia the entrepreneur, Katie Marie the teacher, and Clara Byrd Baker the activist spanned three centuries and blazed the path for generations of African American women to follow. This live performance is included with admission and can be seen every Wednesday through late March.

Let Freedom Ring

The Freedom Bell at the historic First Baptist Church on beautiful Scotland Street in Colonial Williamsburg is begging to be rung! This bell remains an enduring symbol of the faith and perseverance of black Americans. Be a part of this poignant experience and reserve your spot to proclaim your belief in freedom.

A Gathering of Hair

All throughout February, the Governor’s Palace in Colonial Williamsburg is hosting A Gathering of Hair. This moving performance depicts the rich culture and strong relationships cultivated by 18th-century slaves, despite living in a world that limited their freedom in unimaginable ways.